What Responsibilities Do You Have if Ever Presented With a Search Warrant?

If you or a loved one ever finds themselves in the unfortunate circumstance of being served with a search warrant for their home or place of business, it is vital that you understand the steps that you should and should not take.

While you do not want to do anything to interfere or make the situation worse, you also don’t want to contribute to your own arrest or prosecution. The criminal defense attorneys at the Williams Litigation Group have been defending people in Georgia in these types of situations for years. Here are a few things to know:

Cooperate and Allow the Police to Do Their Job

Once you have been presented with the legal documentation granting permission to authorities to search your property, the best thing to do is to stand to the side and offer no resistance. Lack of cooperation will only make matters worse and could lead to an arrest right on the spot when there may not have been one otherwise.

Do Not Offer Any Assistance or Extra Permissions

While you do want to avoid any kind of issue with the police and the conductance of their search, you also do not want to be overly accommodating by providing them permissions or access to parts of your property which are not covered under the terms of the warrant.

One of the first rules that a criminal defense attorney gives to their clients is to simply stand to the side and let the police execute the search. Don’t accidentally set yourself up for more trouble by allowing anything more than what the warrant dictates.

Immediately Contact a Legal Representative When They Leave

The very first thing that you should do once law enforcement has left your property is to call a criminal defense attorney. The experienced and seasoned professionals at the Williams Litigation Group here in Brunswick will be able to offer the advice and instruction you need before your case proceeds any further.

Another good tip is to take pictures of every area in your home or place of business where officers searched before touching anything. You never know what evidence may come in handy later on.